How Ghost Tree Took Big Wave Surfing By Storm… Then Disappeared | Made In Central California Ep1


I feel like tow surfing elevated all
surfing because it really offered two things the ability to catch any wave
you want, and water safety you know a lot of people didn’t know is
physically possible to be able to handle a wipeout from a wave that big?
That was a drop the mic moment like oh wow that’s fifty foot plus you know it’s
bigger than Mavericks. You know at that time the boundaries of paddle surfing
had yet to be really fully tested. I watch golf and Pebble Beach pro-am
goes on all the time and it’s right along the ocean. You know as a surfer
anytime you see you a wave, you’re like whoa is that a wave? And I remember distinctly
watching one day was a nice beautiful day there was some swell running and
seeing in the background these rights peeling off this point. Sure enough in one of our first times
there we got to to tow it for the first time. We did learn a lot that first
session I’m glad that we didn’t show up on a day when it was really really doing
it you know because we wouldn’t have had any idea what to expect.
It was pumping you know definitely pumping but it was it was small in
relation to what was to come. After the word got out that Peter and I had surfed
it, a lot of guys from down there actually said it had been surfed before.
You know guys have paddled into that wave. You know if you come to the spot
first thought would be it’s impossible to surf this place because it’s so close
to the rocks. Those were the days when like people
started you know to tow in and like all of a sudden they realized we can surf
these like fucked up waves that nobody else was to surf you know? Ghost Tree was a different animal in that
on those biggest days there was no way people were going to paddle anyway and
it just became that spot where all the tow guys congregated because it was like
center stage for getting the tallest wave and you didn’t have to worry about
paddle surfers and it was free for all to whip into a 80-foot wave. The tow surfing allowed them to figure
out all the ins and outs of certain spots, rescues with PWC’s. And just being able
to realize you can handle the thrashing of a 50-foot wave you know? A lot of
people didn’t know: is that physically possible to be able to handle a wipeout
from a wave that big? During that time, there was a lot of
confrontation that was happening between surfers. Somehow man we lost one of our
own out there. They’re summiting Everest right now I
think you know. I’m curious to see how much further they can push it. Hi
everyone I’m Michel Bourez. Welcome to the Red Bull Surfing YouTube channel. So
this is the best place to get all the content from Red Bull Airborne, All In,
21 days, and No Contest. Click here to subscribe and click over here to see the
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13 thoughts on “How Ghost Tree Took Big Wave Surfing By Storm… Then Disappeared | Made In Central California Ep1”

  1. There were some guys paddling GT this winter, but it's such a bad wave for paddling that I see why the tow ban caused it to drop off everyone's radar.

  2. Steve Spaulding, Filmmaker, Legend told some of us about the Tree back in the 90's. So did Davi, another local Legend who on a day in 2004 paddled it, embracing the mystery for all eternity. Respect the Legends.

  3. I never see clips of Ghost Tree anymore and it makes me sad. Growing up in nearby Aptos that place was basically just as legendary as Mavericks to me. Maybe even more legendary because it's a more fucked up wave than Mavs

  4. When is the second video releasing? Crazy this is the first time I'm ever hearing of this wave. Great video Red Bull!

  5. bro i live here and im sending it this winter, i live on the 9th hole, so its like 10 mins away form my house

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