Meet the photographer that dives with orcas: Jacques de Vos.


now [Music] [Music] I’m a underwater photographer and cameraman and also a free diving instructor trainer so as a kid I always had an interest in the ocean I also even wanted to become a marine biologist that interest led to an aren’t giving me a cook as a gift and there was a section on Orca in their little description of one Orca are and that always fascinated me just the way they look this was the apex predator years went on and things worked out where I did not become the marine biologist I ended up studying Chemical Engineering the circumstances I ended up working in the oil field around about 2009 there was a recession and I was round about the time I decided that I had an office of oil field and this isn’t something I want to do anymore and you know I always still had this love for the ocean so I started scuba diving and actually in my time off worked up to the point of becoming a scuba instructor this is where I started developing my photography more using freedom [Music] I’m very lucky to be working with guys like Guevara who know the coast around northern Norway really well they also know the marine life cold warning but anyway I should not go down the divers I’m glad between us we have a pretty good idea of potential spots where we might find the animals also you know understanding the weather knowing where you can dive or where you can sail to is also a really important factor [Music] oh that’s perfect audition 3d together good so I’m on the road looking out and we see a group of humpback whales approaching us so the first thing I do is I dive down and wait for them basically you see the shapes long before you see any fine details so you see any shadows appearing out of the water as they come closer and I look up and you can see that now in this moment they’re aware it’s really humbling to have an animal that big stop turn and look at really really look at you before moving on and that’s not just an animal which is seeing something in the water and trying to avoid it as genuine curiosity that’s really something special to experience we [Music] I their justice based on what we’ve seen before we tend to go to places where we know there are areas with a hairy pentanoic and where we know when we seen whales before but that can change from day to day right they were done so badly again sorry a lot of in and out of the boat today moving around [Music] oh yeah they will take the arrogant down [Music] there’s birds right overhead that the eagle and all of these or car racing in the same direction is something there all right more side on or side are perfect and switch off the engine so do not swim towards them until I tell you to get very quietly get in the water now we come into the Seward and we think that there’s Orca here we look around and always see in every single direction is Orca and humpback and they’re just everywhere every 20 seconds you have Orca coming next to you and you know Cobb is coming to look at you and you have contacts just appearing out of nowhere and then disappearing and followed by more cast [Music] it’s one of the most intense experiences I’ve had with so many animals part of the reason it can be so intense is that when you’re freediving you are using a lot less equipment compared to scuba diving this means your movement both physically and in terms of your ability to operate variable depths is not as restricted this usually results in better experiences [Music] here [Music] as a kid the idea of seeing one in the wild like from shore isn’t something I ever imagined would happen so I perceive them underwater it’s just the furthest thing I would ever imagine what actually happened to me [Music] [Music] that’s honest um that was positively amazing this is some of the most impressed vocalizations I’ve ever heard you grab me a blanket I can just sleep out here on the paddleboard

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